December 10th, 2021

How Computational Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence (should) impact Psychological Research

09h30 – Opening of the Series

  • Óscar Gonçalves
    Co-Organizer; Full Professor, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra
  • Paula Paixão
    Director of the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra

09h45 – Opening remarks

  • Jorge Almeida
    Co-Organizer; Associate Professor, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra

10h00 – How Computational Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence (should) impact Psychological Research – models and applications

  • 10h00 – Marie Postma
    AI Methods and techniques in service of research on attention and perception.
    Associate Professor, Department Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence, Tilburg School of Humanities and Digital Sciences, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
  • 10h45 – Raquel Fernández
    Visually Grounded Language Generation in Humans and Machines.
    Associate Professor, Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC), University of Amsterdam.
  • 11h30 – Kendrick Kay
    Leveraging a constrained modeling approach to understand information processing in human visual cortex.
    Assistant Professor, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota.

12h15 – 14h00
Lunch break

14h00 – How Computational Neuroscience and Artificial Intelligence (should) impact Psychological Research – connectivity and representation

  • 14h00 – Gustavo Deco (through Zoom)
    The Turbulent Brain: A New Framework for Analyzing and Modeling Whole-Brain Dynamics.
    Research Professor at the Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA); Full Professor at the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona.
  • 14h45 – Joana Cabral
    Insights into Psychopathology from disrupted Brain Network Dynamics.
    Principal Researcher, Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Medicine, University of Minho.
  • 15h30 – Nikolaus Kriegeskorte (through Zoom)
    Controversial stimuli: Optimizing experiments to adjudicate among computational hypotheses.
    Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Columbia University; Principal Investigator and Director of Cognitive Imaging at the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University.

16h15 – Closing Remarks

  • Amílcar Cardoso
    Full Professor, The Centre for Informatics and Systems of the University of Coimbra (CISUC)

17h00 – Social reception


The first series of NeoPsych was held on December 10th, 2021. Below is the list of the invited speakers.

Marie Postma

Associate Professor, Department Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence, Tilburg School of Humanities and Digital Sciences, Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

Title of the talk:
AI Methods and techniques in service of research on attention and perception.

Marie Postma has background in cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Her research focuses on the way attentional and perceptual processes impact human-AI interactions with applications in education and health. Makes use of AI and data science techniques applied on data collected by means of traditional questionnaires in combination with behavioral data (eye tracking and hand movement tracking) and psychophysiological data (EEG, heart rate and SCL). She obtained her PhD in Philosophy at the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation, University of Amsterdam.

Nikolaus Kriegeskorte

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Columbia University; Principal Investigator and Director of Cognitive Imaging at the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University.

Title of the talk:
Controversial stimuli: Optimizing experiments to adjudicate among computational hypotheses.

Nikolaus Kriegeskorte is a computational neuroscientist who studies how our brains enable us to see and understand the world around us. He is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Columbia University and an affiliated member of the Department of Electrical Engineering.
He is a Principal Investigator and Director of Cognitive Imaging at the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University. He received his PhD in cognitive neuroscience from Maastricht University, held postdoctoral positions at the University of Minnesota and the U.S.
National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, and was a Programme Leader at the U.K. Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge, UK. Kriegeskorte is a co-founder of the conference “Cognitive Computational Neuroscience”.

Kendrick Kay

Assistant Professor, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota.

Title of the talk:
Leveraging a constrained modeling approach to understand information processing in human visual cortex.

Dr. Kendrick Kay is an Assistant Professor at the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research at the University of Minnesota. He received a BA in philosophy from Harvard University in 2002 and a PhD in
psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2009. Research in Dr. Kay’s lab lies at the intersection of cognitive neuroscience, functional magnetic resonance imaging methods, and
computational modeling. The general goal of the lab’s research is to use data-intensive approaches to elucidate the computational principles by which the brain processes sensory information. Dr. Kay is a co-founder of the interdisciplinary conference, Cognitive Computational Neuroscience, which seeks to connect computational-minded researchers across cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and neuroscience. More information about the lab can be found at http://cvnlab.net.

Gustavo Deco

Research Professor at the Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA); Full Professor at the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona.

Title of the talk:
The Turbulent Brain: A New Framework for Analyzing and Modeling Whole-Brain Dynamics.

Gustavo Deco is Research Professor at the Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Professor (Catedrático)  at the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) where he leads the
Computational Neuroscience group. He is also Director of the Center of Brain and Cognition (UPF). In 1987 he received his PhD in Physics for his thesis on Relativistic Atomic Collisions. In 1987, he was a
postdoc at the University of Bordeaux in France. From 1988 to 1990, he obtained a postdoc of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at the University of Giessen in Germany. From 1990 to 2003, he
leads the Computational Neuroscience Group at Siemens Corporate Research Center in Munich, Germany. He obtained in 1997 his Habilitation (maximal academical degree in Germany) in Computer
Science (Dr. rer. nat. habil.) at the Technical University of Munich for his thesis on Neural Learning. In 2001, he received his PhD in Psychology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich.

Raquel Fernández

Associate Professor, Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC), University of Amsterdam.

Title of the talk:
Visually Grounded Language Generation in Humans and Machines.

Raquel Fernández is Associate Professor at the Institute for Logic, Language & Computation, University of Amsterdam, where she leads the Dialogue Modelling Group. Her work and interests revolve around language use in context, including computational semantics and pragmatics, dialogue interaction, visually-grounded language processing, and language learning, among others. Her group carries out research on these topics at the interface of computational linguistics, cognitive modelling and artificial intelligence.

After studying Cognitive Science and Language in Barcelona (her home city), Raquel received her PhD in Computational Linguistics from King’s College London. Before moving to
Amsterdam, she held research positions at the Linguistics Department of the University of Potsdam and at the Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI), Stanford University. Over her career, she has been awarded several prestigious personal fellowships by the Dutch Research Council and is currently the recipient of a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant. Other distinctions include having been a member of the Editorial Board of the journals Computational Linguistics and Dialogue & Discourse, co-president of the SemDial
Workshop Series
for ten years, and member of the scientific advisory board of SIGdial in several occasions.

Joana Cabral

Principal Investigator, Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Medicine, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal

Title of the talk:
Insights into Psychopathology from disrupted Brain Network Dynamics

I hold a PhD in Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience and a MSc+BSc in Biomedical Engineering, currently working as postdoctoral researcher at the Life and Health Sciences Research Institute of the University of Minho in Portugal. I hold visiting positions at the Hedonia Research Group, UK, at the Shemesh lab at the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Lisbon, Portugal and at the Center for Music in the Brain in Aarhus University, Denmark. 

My main interest is to investigate the fundamental principles underlying brain function. In other words, I am curious about the most primitive biophysical mechanisms at the genesis of coordinated brain activity, ultimately leading to our thoughts and actions. In my research, I test hypothetical mechanistic scenarios using analytical and numerical methods to investigate fundamental brain mechanisms.